Posts Tagged ‘EHR’

Good patient data is not always meaningful patient data

I’ve been thinking recently about some of the newer sources of health data, namely patient-generated data. My working headline is something like “Good patient data is not always meaningful patient data.”

mobile3I have the distinct sense that our rapt attention to mobile devices, mobile health, patient data, patient-generated data, etc. is all really exciting for those of us who are in technology because we love the idea of sensors and capturing data that could never be captured before and building massive databases and doing all this great regression analysis on it to look for tipping points and trends and turning it into cool graphical reports. It’s fun and exciting and sexy!

But patient-generated data often breaks down when it meets the physician. And here’s why.

There’s a tidal wave of patient generated data from apps and devices that is only increasing. When you read stats about how many tens of thousands of medical health apps there are in the Apple Store and how new devices are being launched every other week, it leads to a deluge of patient data.

Data from patient apps and devices – activity level, heart rate, blood glucose, etc. – is all “structured” within its environment, that’s good, but it’s not interoperable with any other data. This means that the data is seldom integrated with any electronic medical records system (EMR) at the physician level. That’s a problem for doctors wanting (required) to leverage these systems to interact with their patients.

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Cryptos Unite! Lock down those iPad patient data leaks!

You know all those shiny iPads in the hands of doctors? The ones that are used during office visits, replacing the old paper charts? Now that doctors are embracing Electronic Health Records and working overtime to ensure that they can prove Meaningful Use, we’ve introduced a new unintended consequence. We’ve introduced another opportunity for the compromise of sensitive patient records.

In the last two years, HHS reports that there have been 116 data leaks of 500 records or more, compromising more than 1.9 million patients’ personal health information. Was there are break-in at a hospital data center? No, nothing that exciting. All these security breaches were the result of a lost or stolen mobile device that stored patient medical records… So in these cases it didn’t matter how secure the hospital or physician practice server was. Mobile devices have the ability to extend the enterprise beyond the office or hospital, and this is where data vulnerability is introduced… Read Full Article Now »